Mary, Mother of God

In the year 431 at the Council of Ephesus, the Church declared Mary to be Theotokos, which is Greek for “Mother of God” or “God Bearer.” The Church did this because in that same century a great heresy had broken out. A priest named Anastasius had publicly declared that Mary was the Mother of Jesus Christ, but not the Mother of God. What he was saying, effectively, was that Jesus was not God. Anastasius just could not believe that Jesus could be born of a woman, walk the earth, suffer and die on a cross and remain God at the same time. And so, for Him, Mary could not be the Mother of God.

However, Mary is the Mother of God. She is the Mother of God, because she is the Mother of Jesus, who is God. And she is the only one who, along with God the Father, can say to Jesus, “You are my Son.” God had predestined her from all eternity to bear His Son, and He could not have created a more perfect mother.

And Mary is also Mother of the Eucharist, because that same Son of Mary, that same Jesus – her own flesh and blood – is the same God who comes to us on this altar at every Mass. The same Jesus whom Mary bore in her womb is the same God in the Eucharist. The same Jesus who lay in a manger is the same God in the Eucharist. The same Jesus who walked on earth, preached in Galilee and healed the sick is the same God in the Eucharist. The same Jesus who suffered and died on the Cross is the same God in the Eucharist. The same Jesus who sits at the right hand of the Father in glory is the same God in the Eucharist. Jesus in the crib, Jesus on the Cross, Jesus on the altar. It is the same Jesus who still loves us and wants to be with us.

Whenever we receive the Body of Christ, we receive the body conceived and carried, formed and nourished by His Mother, Mary. One spiritual writer says, “It is impossible for this relation in the flesh between Mother and Son ever to be broken, because traces of her are always in His flesh.” And so just as there can be no God Incarnate without Mary, there can be no Eucharist without Mary.

What a gift and a mystery! And how fitting it is, then, that we at St. Ann Parish pray the Hail Mary three times at the conclusion of every Mass.

In Christ —

Monsignor Tom Powers
Parochial Administrator of St. Ann Parish

 

Mass times


Monday - Saturday
8:00 am

Saturday Vigil
4:00 pm

Sunday
8:00 am, 10:00 am, 12:00 pm (Spanish)


confession


Saturday
3:00 - 3:45 pm

15 minutes prior to every Mass